News

Gamma Sig Tau and Bridge Initiative Work Party

The 9/17 work party was led by Troy Weston, Steve Lyncha and Chad Bell of the MNC with the assistance of volunteers from the Gamma Sig Tau Chapter service fraternity and The Bridge Initiative groups.

The groups started out by clearing multiple downed trees across the Blue trail toward the top of the Mountain. Once on top, they continued the clearing/widening of our existing trails of overgrown brush and downed trees for the emergency responder access across the top of the Mountain toward the Lynch Overlook.

Both of these groups did a great job and some well appreciated hard work.

Circle K & Council of Lionhearts Work Party

The 9/11 Work Party was organized by Penn State University Park Circle K and Council of Lionhearts. Volunteers came from:

  1. Gamma Sigma Sigma Tau Chapter
  2. The Penn State Rotaract Club
  3. The Graduate and Professional Student Association

To allow emergency responders open access to Mount Nittany trails, these fine volunteers cleared trails from the Rockview State Prison land border to MNC maintained trails. Over 30 downed trees eliminated from emergency access path as per guidance from the Central Region Emergency Strike Team (C.R.E.S.T).

Great job and lots of hard work done by all!

Thank You ... One and All!

Thank You … One and All!

Patrick Scholl, Emeritus Board Member

We have the saddest of news to share today. One of Mt. Nittany’s staunchest friends, Patrick Scholl, passed away on March 13, 2016.

Patrick along with his wife Jan were great supporters of the Mountain. Patrick was a longtime Board Member, and served as Treasurer of the Conservancy from November 2001 to November 2008.

Patrick, your final resting spot may be far away, but you will forever be remembered by those that knew and loved you. As mentioned in your obituary below, we hope that people do take in a Spikes game in your honor. They can then look out at Mt. Nittany and be grateful for your tireless work to protect it.

Patrick_Scholl.jpg

Imparting wisdom at Nov 20, 2010 meeting.

Patrick Scholl
1952-2016

Patrick J. Scholl, 63, of State College, Pennsylvania died March 13, 2016 at home. He was born to Edwin and Patricia Scholl of Rockwell, Iowa. He is survived by his mother, his wife Jan, and brother, Daniel, mayor of Humboldt, Iowa. His sister, Rose Ann, and father are deceased. Patrick was the Director of Business and Finance for the Penn State University Alumni Association for 28 years and was well known in the State College community. He held a similar position in the College of Agriculture at the University of Wyoming and was the manager of research contracts and grants at Iowa State University.

He received a B.S. degree in accounting from ISU, an MBA from Drake University, and was a doctoral candidate at Penn State. He was certified as a CPA for 30 years.

An active parishioner of Our Lady of Victory Catholic Church in State College, Patrick served as lector, Eucharistic minister, and assisted with pre-cana instruction. He was also on the Penn State Credit Union board for several terms and the coordinating committee for the annual Juvenile Diabetes Research walk-a-thon.

He traveled to various parts of the world with alumni, including: Costa Rica, Ireland, Russia and the Scandinavian countries. He sailed through the Panama Canal. Patrick received a 50 year medal from the Joslin Diabetes Center and the Alumni Association’s Mentor and Lewis and Karen Gold awards.

Patrick was a baseball fan with season tickets to Spikes games. He visited major league stadiums and annually aired a “Who’s on First” radio segment with local announcer, Steve Jones. On road trips to Iowa he stopped to see the “Field of Dreams, near Dyersville. A memorial Mass for Patrick will be held Saturday, April 9 at 10:30 AM at the Our Lady of Victory Church, 820 Westerly Parkway, followed by a reception in the social hall. Interment will be in Iowa at the convenience of the family.

The family requests no calls, deliveries or visitations at home at this time. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the church’s Gabriel Project, the Penn State Alumni Association, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, or by purchasing a Spikes baseball ticket to enjoy a summer game.

Ben Novak Archives

The Ben Novak Archives are a collection of Dr. Novak’s materials relevant for understanding his thinking and his Penn State spirit. We offer them here for reference purposes, making no judgment on their contents.

About Ben Novak

Ben Novak is the author of “Hitler and Abductive Logic: The Strategy of a Tyrant,” as well as “Is Penn State a Real University?: An Investigation of the University as a Living Ideal” and “The Birth of the Craft Brew Revolution.”

Novak served on the Board of Trustees of the Pennsylvania State University from 1988 to 2000. Born in Johnstown, Pennsylvania on Feb. 15, 1943, Novak graduated from Penn State in 1965, having served as president of the Undergraduate Student Government in his senior year and as a brother at Tau Kappa Epsilon.

In 1968 he graduated from Georgetown University Law School. From 1968 to 1970 he served as a Captain in the U.S. Army, Infantry, including a year in Viet Nam where he won the Bronze Star. In 1968 Novak was admitted to the Bar of Pennsylvania. He practiced law in Pennsylvania for more than 30 years, with his own firm in State College and Bellefonte.

While living in Centre County for more than three decades, Novak was widely involved in the community. He was, at various times: founder of the Mount Nittany Conservancy; president of Lion’s Paw Alumni Association; a Ph.D. recipient in philosophy, history, and political science from Penn State; and an adjunct professor and assistant dean of students at Penn State.

In 2000 he retired, moving to Bratislava in Slovakia, his family’s ancestral nation. In 2008 he returned to the United States to advise students at Penn State, and has earnestly sought a renewal in University life according to the vision of Evan Pugh and the Founders of Penn State for many years.

In 2014, the Mount Nittany Conservancy recognized Novak’s contributions with its “Friend of the Mountain” award.

Penn State

Academic/Scholarly Contributions

Other

Our Street Names Are Memorials

It’s always great when we come into deeper contact with the life and history of the place we live. That happened last year with a column for Town & Gown about a project cataloging the CBICC historical archive:

Vince Verbeke, immediate past president of the Mount Nittany Conservancy, left a comment on the article that included some pretty cool information on the origins of State College’s many unique street names. I think it’s great to have that knowledge in the back of your head as you’re out navigating around town, because it helps remind of its unique character and history and enhances the experience of the place. It’s a little thing, of course; but those often are the very details that enrich our lives, no?

Vince comments: “Did you know that Fairmount Ave is so named because of its higher location gave it the best view of Mt. Nittany from town?”

He then adds the following, which is drawn from the History of State College, 1896-1946:

“Our Street Names Are Memorials”

Frequently asked by newcomers to the town, and occasionally by “oldtimers,” is the question, “From what source were such unusual street names derived?” State College streets are in a sense memorials to outstanding residents and faculty members. For instance, the name “Foster” has always been prominent in the history of the town. At one time, there were nine Mrs. Fosters in the village! Today there are seven telephones listed under that name. The inclusion, here, of a list of street names and their sources may prove interesting. Several of those listed are not yet within the borough limits. A, part of this list is included in Mr. Ferree’s thesis. (Name of street is given first and for whom named follows.)

Allen street – Dr. William Allen, president of the College, 1864 – 1866.
Atherton street – Dr. George W. Atherton, pres. f the College, 1882 – 1906.
Barnard street – Prof. L. H. Barnard, professor of civil engineering.
Beaver Ave – Gen. James A. Beaver, early landowner, influential in gaining aid for College; president of Board of Trustees, 1873 – 1881 and 1897 – 1915.
Buckhout street – W. A. Buckhout, professor of botany and a prominent citizen.
Burrowes street – Dr. T. H. Burrowes, president of the College, 1868 – 1871.
Butz street – George C. Butz, professor of horticulture, first president of borough council.
Calder Alley – Dr. James Calder, president, 1871 – 1880.
College Ave – Proximity to College.
Corl street – Several Corl families of the town.
Fairmount Ave – View of Mount Nittany.
Fairway Road – Named for J. T. McCormick’s first wife, Anna Maria Fair.
Foster Ave – Named for many Foster families who featured in the town’s history.
Frazier street – Gen. John Fraser, president of the College, 1866 – 1868.
Garner street – Samuel Garner, former landowner and farmer of State College.
Gill street – Rev. Benjamin Gill, D.D., chaplain for many years.
Glenn Road – For the Dr. W. S. Glenn Sr. family.
Hamilton Ave – John Hamilton, former landowner and for 37 years treasurer of the College.
Hartswick Ave – Henry Hartswick, son – in – law of John Neidigh, early settler.
Heister street – Gabriel Heister, one of the first trustees of the College.
Hetzel Place – Ralph Dorn Hetzel, president of the College, 1927 – 1947.
High street – Because of its location on high ground.
Highland Ave – Named for home of Prof. John Hamilton, “The Highlands.”
Hillcrest Ave – Named for its location on a ridge.
Holmes street – Holmes family, active in the borough organization.
Hoy street – W. A. Hoy, fourth burgess of the borough.
Irvin Ave – Gen. James Irvin, once part owner of Centre Furnace Lands, and donor of 200 acres of land for College.
Jackson street and Ave – Josiah P. Jackson, professor of mathematics, 1880 – 1893; and his son, John Price Jackson, dean of the School of Engineering, 1909 – 1915.
James Place – James T. Aikens estate.
Keller street – The Keller family of State College.
Krumrine Ave – Fred and John C. Krumrine families.
Locust Lane – Named from trees bordering the street.
Lytle street – Andrew Lytle, supervisor of roads in College township at time borough was formed.
Markle street – “Abe” Markle, early landowner and town’s first butcher.
McAllister street – Hugh N. McAllister, promoter of the College and designer of the original Old Main.
McCormick Ave – John T. McCormick, who helped organize the First National Bank.
McKee street – James Y. McKee, acting president, 1881 – 1882. Also vice – president for many years.
Miles street – Col. Samuel Miles, part owner of Centre Furnace ore furnace until 1832.
Mitchell Ave – Judge H. Walton Mitchell, president of the Board of Trustees, 1915 – 1930.
Nittany Ave – Nittany Valley and mountain.
Osman street – David Ozman, first blacksmith.
Park Ave – Formerly called “Lovers Lane,” changed to Park because its many trees resembled a park.
Patterson street – W. C. Patterson, the second burgess of State College.
Pugh street – Dr. Evan Pugh, first president of the College, 1859 – 1864.
Ridge Ave – Because it is higher than Park Ave.
Sauers street – John Sauers, first shoemaker.
Shattuck Drive – Professor Shattuck, first borough engineer, appointed 1907.
Sparks street – Dr. Edwin E. Sparks, president of the College, 1907 – 1920.
Sunset Road – Because it runs directly toward the sunset.
Thomas street – Dr. John M. Thomas, president of the College, 1920 – 1925.
Thompson street – Named for Moses Thompson whose early aid helped establish the College here.
Waring Ave – William G. Waring, first agricultural superintendent of the Farm School.
Woodland Drive – Location in a natural woodlot.

Work Party Nov 1, 2015 (Lion Ambassadors)

On Sunday, November 1, 2015 a volunteer group from the Penn State Lion Ambassadors assisted the Conservancy with some trail maintenance. The group was led by Mt. Ambassador Steve Lyncha. MNC Director Chad Bell and Mt. Ambassador Troy Weston also went up with the work party.

The small but energetic group cleared brush/limbs along trails. They also removed several dead trees near the trail (widow makers).

2015_11_01-Lion-Ambassadors.jpg

Jordan, Alex, Erin, Aubrey, Taylor, and Morgan (Lion Ambassadors)

Work Party Oct 24, 2015 (Omega Phi Alpha)

Saturday, October 24, 2015 saw the Omega Phi Alpha national service sorority assist the Conservancy with much needed trail maintenance.

Photo #1 shows the entire team that worked cutting back brush and installing barriers to “erosion risk” areas on the Blue Trail.

Photos #2 and #3 shows the smaller group that helped to install a new log seating bench on the Blue Trail.

2015_10_24_Omega-Phi-Alpha_1.jpg

Omega Phi Alpha Service Sorority

2015_10_24_Omega-Phi-Alpha_2.jpg

Packing in the chain saw!

2015_10_24_Omega-Phi-Alpha_3.jpg

New log seat added along the Blue Trail